Monthly Archives: June 2012

Transportation bill receives “groans” from cycling advocates

A bicyclist heads north on 21st Street in Sacramento Thursday evening during the evening commute.

Bicycling advocates are labeling the federal transportation bill a disaster for cycling. The bill was finally filed on Wednesday.
“The bad news: it’s a terrible bill for biking and walking. The new law will likely represent more than 60% cuts in funding for biking and walking. It turns back 20 years of progress in federal policy to make our streets safer, healthier, and more accessible,” says the America Bikes blog. But it could have been worse, the blog goes on to say. Read the full blog post here.
For an excellent analysis of the bill, check out this post by Jonathan Maus on BikePortland.org. And, for a review of the legislation check out this article on DC.STREETSBLOG.ORG.



Posted from Sacramento, California, United States.

Leave a comment

News and notes: SFGate and Slate

Morning Commute – A cyclist makes the turn off the bike trail into Old Sacramento at the end of I Street near the Sacramento History Museum on Tuesday morning as the sun rises over the city.

In the ongoing saga that is the federal transportation bill, Carolyn Lochhead, Washington correspondent for the San Francisco Chronicle recently wrote this analysis on the SFGate Politics Blog: Pedestrian and bicycle groups fear they will be thrown under bus.
And, while you’re at the Chronicle’s website, check out the column by C.W. Nevius that looks at Strava and its KOM (King of the Mountain) awards and how it allegedly causes reckless behavior.
“Set the fastest time, and you are awarded a KOM Crown. But face it; no one is setting a best time in the city without running stop signs and red lights. There may be only a few reckless KOM types on Strava, but they are exactly the kind of dangerous riders we’re trying to slow down,” Nevius writes.
And, lastly, another article that’s definitely worth reading is by Slate’s music critic, Jody Rosen, who recently had his bike stolen (in New York), but, was able to recover it using Twitter. Of note, Rosen cites some interesting bicycle statistics, “Bicycle theft is a national epidemic. Each year, more than 1 million bikes are stolen in the United States. In 2010, the most recent year for which the FBI has figures, stolen bikes accounted for 3.3 percent of U.S. larceny-theft cases. Those numbers only begin to tell the story — most bike thefts go unreported,” Rosen writes.



Posted from Sacramento, California, United States.

1 Comment

In the news: Spitting on the bike trail and other inappropriate behavior

A cyclist rides along the American River bike trail near the intersection with NorthGate Blvd. Thursday evening. Park rangers and police have increased patrols and ticketing in the area according to a column in Friday’s Sacramento Bee.

Tony Bizjak’s Back-seat Driver column in the Friday morning Sacramento Bee takes on trail etiquette on the American River Parkway and then segues into some of the changes taking place along the trail.
“Summer is high season for parkway use. One of the sad bike trail realities is, the more crowded it gets, the angrier some get, and the worse some behavior becomes,” Bizjak wrote.



Posted from Sacramento, California, United States.

Leave a comment

Summer Solstice

A solitary bike rests against a signal light pole at the corner of H Street and 21st Street in Sacramento Thursday morning as the sun rises on the Summer Solstice, the day of the year with the most light.

Posted from Sacramento, California, United States.

Leave a comment

LA Times story: San Francisco’s car-bike debate

A story in the Los Angeles Times by Maria L. La Ganga on Saturday looks at the ongoing conversation in San Francisco over bikes vs. cars vs. pedestrians. La Ganga uses the recent death of a pedestrian hit by a cyclist to take a look at San Francisco’s efforts to reduce automobile traffic.
“In the ongoing smart-growth discussion, San Francisco offers a cautionary tale for cities where officials are mulling antidotes to sprawl and working toward less dependence on the private auto,” La Ganga wrote. Read the article here.

Leave a comment

In the news, mobile apps, bike racks and riding in the lane

A cyclist checks out her smartphone while riding on the American River Bike trail near Sac State. A recent news article laments the lack of smartphone apps for cyclists.

Check out the lastest article by Blair Anthony Robertson in on sacbee.com about the new bike docks being sold by local business.
“They’re low-key and will never be mistaken for public art, but Sacramento-based Park a Bike’s Varsity model racks are considered one of the best of their kind,” Robertson writes.
Speaking of biking stuff, this recent article in the New York Times by Joshua Brustein laments the lack of smartphone apps available to cyclists.
“…I went looking for the biking equivalent of clever subway apps like Exit Strategy or EmbarkNYC, and was surprised at how little inventive thinking I found. For iPhone users, at least, there is not even a great way to get directions on a phone,” Brustein writes.
And with all the talk these days about the three-foot passing bill, there’s an interesting article on the Cycling Savvy website about why it is better to ride in the middle of the lane than on the side.
“Driving in the middle of the lane actually protects cyclists against the most common motorist-caused crashes: sideswipes, right hooks, left crosses, and drive-outs,” the article states.

Leave a comment

Sacramento Bike Racks


There seem to be a lot more bike racks going up around Sacramento. The city has been adding their standard bike racks along the downtown streets, but there are also some very inventive racks appearing, especially on the R Street corridor. Here are images of a few of the more interesting racks. Please leave a comment or use the contact form to send me a message about your favorite bike rack and I will try to add it to the gallery. All the images were taken with the Hipstamatic app on the iPhone to give them a different look.

1 Comment